Classical Music online - News, events, bios, music & videos on the web.

Classical music and opera by Classissima

Johann Sebastian Bach

Friday, September 22, 2017


My Classical Notes

September 19

Sviatoslav Richter With Orchestra

My Classical NotesOn this recording, Sviatoslav Richter with Orchestra perform the following selections: Bach, J S: Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D major, BWV1050, with Oleg Kagan (violin) & Marina Vorozhtsova (flute)and the Moscow Conservatory Chamber Orchestra, Yuri Nikolayevsky conducting. Haydn: Keyboard Concerto in D major, H. 18/11, with the Minsk Chamber Orchestra, Yuri Tsyiruk conducting. Scriabin: Prometheus (The Poem of Fire), Op. 60, with the All-Union Radio and Central Television Large Chorus & USSR State Symphony Orchestra, Evgeny Svetlanov conducting. The opportunity to see Richter in live performance is a treasure. It’s even more exciting to see him in two major works by favorite composers which do not exist in audio-only recordings. Here is Sviatoslav Richter, performing the music of Bach:

Drew McManus - Adaptistration

September 20

The Beleaguered Bach Festival

Just when you thought the Oregon Bach Festival (OBF) may have been able to take off its PR damage control hat, the New York Times published a wonderfully comprehensive article by Michael Cooper on 9/18/2017 that thrust everything back into the limelight. Cooper provides all the overview and backstory needed to fully understand the scope of why this is such an excellent study in PR crisis management. In addition to well-worn details, the article spends time examining more of the Founder’s Syndrome issues we examined on 9/15/2017. More to the point, the article spells out in no uncertain language why this could be more than a rough transitional period for the group. “This is a distinguished festival with a distinguished past, and it’s just sad to see it committing suicide,” said Thomas W. Morris, who has run the Cleveland and Boston Symphony orchestras and is now artistic director of the Ojai Music Festival in California. […] But donors and artists may think twice about getting involved with a festival in tumult. The tenor Nicholas Phan, who appeared at the festival this summer, said in an email that he worried that its special atmosphere and brand of music making “now seems to be in jeopardy.” Edward Maclary, who leads a master class in conducting, said that he was concerned that the festival “will not offer the same sorts of artistic and educational opportunities.” [OBF co-founder Helmuth Rilling], 84, declined to comment since he is not privy to the festival’s recent internal doings. But his manager, Christoph Drescher, said he “is not happy about the news from Eugene.” In addition to the NYT article, Oregon Arts Watch published an article by Bob Hicks on 9/15/2017 that included an overview and commentary on the situation. I wish every major metropolitan area had a culture outlet like Oregon Arts Watch; having an independent voice capable of delivering transparency from a local perspective is an invaluable component to any healthy cultural environment. Secrecy hurts in many ways. Halls is a rising star in the music world, with an international reputation, and the appearance is that he was fired for no discernible reason. Under the circumstances, who of substance, even in a “guest curator” situation, will be willing to take his place? How many guest performers and other musicians of note will now want to perform at the festival? Already there are rumblings of an exodus. Has the festival assured through its actions that it will become, if it survives, simply a regional educational event, without the ambitious reach it once enjoyed? As crucially, considering the public relations damage that has already been done, can the festival regain the public’s trust? This is a mess. And it needs actual solving, not just a lawyerly brushing-up of the crumbs. At this point, one thing seems clear: the more attention this situation receives, the better OBF’s dismissed artistic director Matthew Halls looks and the harder it will be for the OBF (and their parent organization, the University of Oregon) to successfully dig out from under the deluge of bad press and bitter feelings.




The Well-Tempered Ear

September 19

Classical music: The Madison Bach Musicians perform “imitative” works by Bach and Vivaldi this coming Saturday night and Sunday afternoon

By Jacob Stockinger In an original program that is organized much like the music it features, the early music group Madison Bach Musicians (below) will open their new season this weekend with a concert that offers a counterpoint of music by Johann Sebastian Bach and Antonio Vivaldi — all done with period instrument and historically informed performance practices. The two concerts are: This coming Saturday night, Sept. 23, with a 6:45 p.m. pre-concert lecture by MBM founder, artistic director and keyboardist Trevor Stephenson (below), and a 7:30 p.m. concert at the First Unitarian Society of Madison, 900 University Bay Drive in Madison. This coming Sunday afternoon, Sept. 24, with 2:45 p.m. pre-concert lecture and a 3:30 p.m. concert at Holy Wisdom Monastery, 4200 County Road M, in Middleton. The guest soloist is Steuart Pincombe (below, in a photo by Ryan West), who plays the baroque cello. He will join the Madison Bach Musicians for this innovative concert – an dual exploration of fugues and imitation from the German Bach and the Italian Vivaldi — two masters of the Baroque. The concert itself is structured much like a fugue. Starting from a single voice, selections alternate between pieces by Vivaldi (below top) and by Bach (below bottom) ―with each new section of the concert requiring an additional performer. (Sorry, no word on specific works except for the finale.) The program culminates with the entire ensemble performing Vivaldi’s D minor Concerto Grosso alongside a string arrangement of Bach’s own transcription of the same piece. (You can hear the original by Vivaldi in the YouTube video at the bottom.) Advance-sale discount tickets cost $30 for general admission and at available ate at Orange Tree Imports and Willy Street Co-op, East and West. Advance sale online tickets can be found at: www.madisonbachmusicians.org Tickets at the door are $33 for the general public, and $30 for seniors 65-plus with Student Rush tickets costing $10 and going on sale 30 minutes before the pre-concert lecture. Tagged: Antonio Vivaldi , arrangement , Artistic director , Arts , Bach , Baroque , Cello , Chamber music , Classical music , concerto , Concerto Grosso , counterpoint , Early music , finale , First Unitarian Society of Madison , fugue , German , Germany , historically informed performance practices , Holy Wisdom Monastery , imitation , innovate , innovative , Italian , Italy , Jacob Stockinger , Keyboard , lecture , Madison , Madison Bach Musicians , monastery , Music , online , Orange Tree Imports , Orchestra , period instruments , program , Sonata , Steuart Pincombe , strings , Student , symphony , ticket , transcription , Trevor Stephenson , United States , University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Music , University of Wisconsin–Madison , Viola , Violin , Vivaldi , voice , Willy Street Co-op , Wisconsin , work , YouTube



The Well-Tempered Ear

September 18

Classical music: Starting this Sunday night, the next month is busy for the UW-Madison’s acclaimed Pro Arte Quartet with FREE concerts of music by Mozart, Brahms and Schubert

By Jacob Stockinger The opening concert of the new season of the Pro Arte Quartet (below, in a photo by Rick Langer) is this coming Sunday night, Sept. 24, at 7:30 p.m. in Mills Hall. The Pro Arte Quartet will give an all-Mozart program, featuring Alicia Lee (below), the new clarinet professor at the UW-Madison . The works to be performed are the G Major “Haydn” String Quartet, K. 387, called the “Spring” Quartet, and the famed late Clarinet Quintet in A Major, K. 581. (You can hear the sublime slow movement of the Clarinet Quintet in the YouTube video at the bottom.) Here is a link to biographies of new faculty members at the UW-Madison School of Music, including that of Lee: http://www.music.wisc.edu/2017/06/20/new-faculty-hires-at-the-school-of-music/ In early October, the internationally celebrated violist Nobuko Imai (below) returns to the UW-Madison campus, on her way from Europe to a concert in Minneapolis. Her master class on viola and chamber music will be on Wednesday, Oct. 4, at 7:30 p.m. Morphy Recital Hall. It is FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. The following day, Thursday, Oct. 5, at NOON in Mills Hall, Imai will perform a FREE public concert with members of the Pro Arte Quartet and guest cellist Jean-Michel Fonteneau (below). The program is a single work, a masterpiece: the Brahms G Major Viola Quintet, Op. 111. It is legendary for the first viola part, according to a member of the quartet, and Imai would herself be legendary in this role. Cellist Fonteneau is a member of the San Francisco Trio, and is familiar to Madison audiences through his many acclaimed appearances with the Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society. Adds Pro Arte violist Sally Chisholm: “This particular concert is another gesture to all the long-time supporters of the Pro Arte and the Madison community who remain part of our legacy.” The Pro Arte’s second concert, also FREE and open to the public, is Saturday night, Oct. 28, in Mills Hall. It is will be all Schubert – the flute and piano theme and variations, and the Schubert Octet , featuring members of both the Wingra Wind Quintet and the Pro Arte Quartet. Says Chisholm: “The Schubert Octet has been much discussed up and down the fourth floor of the School of Music for several years, and suddenly, we said “Let’s do it!” “We checked calendars, and the Wingra was free to join us on Oct. 28. Whether this is a first performance of the Schubert, or one of many, the feeling is always that we never have the chance to perform it often enough. We hope it brings us all together with hope and joy.” The Pro Arte Quartet’s longtime cellist Parry Karp continues to teach and coach chamber musicians, but he has been sidelined by a finger injury and will not yet be back to perform these concerts. He is scheduled to return to performing in November, according to Chisholm. Tagged: Arts , Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society , biography , Cello , Chamber music , clarinet , Classical music , coach , community , Concert , Europe , faculty , flute , Franz Schubert , Haydn , injury , Jacob Stockinger , Jean-Michel Fonteneau , Johannes Brahms , Madison , masterpiece , Minneapolis , Mozart , Music , Musician , Nobuko Imai , Octet , Parry Karp , perform , performance , Piano , Pro Arte Quartet , quintet , San Francisco , San Francisco Trio , Season , String quartet , string quintet , strings , teach , theme and variations , United States , University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Music , University of Wisconsin–Madison , variations , Viola , Wingra Wind Quintet , Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart , YouTube

Tribuna musical

September 18

Tríos, cuartetos y quintetos por notables conjuntos: el placer de la música de cámara

Más allá de los gustos personales, creo que el melómano completo debe gustar de diversos géneros: no sólo la ópera o el ballet o la música sinfónica, sino también el género de cámara, ya sea instrumental o vocal, o incluso el recital de un solo instrumento. El panorama que sigue abarca trios para piano y cuerdas, cuartetos para piano y cuerdas, cuartetos para cuerdas y quintetos para piano y cuerdas. En todas esas combinaciones hay obras maestras. Idealmente –por algo son "de cámara"- deberían escucharse en ámbitos de cálida acústica y no muy grandes. En la práctica, suelen tocarse en salas de gran capacidad, y no hay duda de que ello les saca esa intimidad, esa introspección que necesitan para ser cabalmente apreciadas. ZUKERMAN TRIO La sala de AMIJAI es a mi juicio una de las más adecuadas, y Pinchas Zukerman tiene una relación de muchos años con ella. Un lleno total aplaudió al trío que él lidera y que también integran su esposa, la violoncelista sudafricana Amanda Forsyth, y la pianista canadiense de ascendencia china, Angela Cheng. La calidad de estos artistas es importante y muy pareja; si bien Zukerman los lidera, lo hace con una discreción que permite a cada uno expresar lo mejor de sí mismo. El violinista está casado con Forsyth, una espléndida rubia alta sudafricana que impacta con su presencia pero que además es una artista de primer nivel; nunca pierde de vista a su marido pero no hay subordinación en su sonido potente y en su fraseo intenso. Y Cheng podrá parecer opaca hasta que empieza a tocar y uno advierte su completa técnica y noble musicalidad. Zukerman desde hace años está sumergido en la música de cámara en el mejor sentido, sin divismo y con un estilo límpido lejano de su juventud poderosa y ardiente pero siempre atrayente y respetuoso de los compositores abordados. Los tres tienen una perfecta compenetración y comunican las obras con la siempre deseable unidad que este género requiere. Si bien no fueron anunciadas como primera audición, las muy gratas Ocho piezas para violín y violoncelo, Op.39, fueron una novedad para mí; escritas en 1909, son típìcas del estro romántico del ucraniano Reinhold Glière (de padre alemán y madre polaca), 1875-1956, cuya mejor obra es la imponente sinfonía programática "Ilya Murometz". Las piezas son óptima música de salón, sin pretensiones de profundidad pero de notable artesanía y encanto, y fueron admirablemente ejecutadas, Tanto el Segundo Trío de Shostakovich, que data de 1944, como el Primer trío de Schubert, Op.99, creado en 1828, el año de su muerte (aunque es luminosa y ajena al clima dramático del Cuarteto "La muerte y la doncella" o del Quinteto para cuerdas) son obras maestras esenciales. La del ruso tiene la misma originalidad que su Quinteto para piano y cuerdas, aunando solidez estructural a ideas elegíacas (como la melodía aguda en armónicos tocada por el violoncelo al principio mismo), satíricas (el Scherzo), densas y sombrías (la Passacaglia) o trágicas (esa danza judía en homenaje a las víctimas de Treblinka en el último movimiento). Las ejecuciones fueron magistrales en su penetración psicológica y fuerte transmisión del mensaje dramático en Shostakovich, y su escrupulosa articulación y pura belleza en Schubert. Fuera de programa, un inesperado regalo de Frirz Kreisler, esa divertida Marcha Vienesa raramente ejecutada. TRIO OSMANTHYS El Mozarteum presentó en el Colón el debut argentino del Trío Osmanthys, curioso nombre no explicado. Está integrado por Carolin Widmann, violín; Marie-Elisabeth Hecker, violoncelo; y Martin Helmchen, piano. Widmann había venido antes en dos ocasiones, dejando una buena impresión. Hecker y Helmchen están casados, los tres son alemanes. Han desarrollado valiosas carreras por separado y formaron este trío por razones tanto de amistad y afecto como por coincidir en los enfoques estilísticos. Iniciaron su programa con una breve obra en primera audición de Lili Boulanger, "D´un matin du printemps" ("De una mañana de primavera"), 1918, el año final de su muy corta vida (24 años). Hermana de Nadia Boulanger, la más famosa profesora de composición del siglo XX, Lili fue un talento indudable y llegó a dejar obras que Buenos Aires debería conocer, como el Pie Jesu o los tres salmos que llegó a escribir. La pieza que escuchamos resultó de un buen gusto refinado, y también existe en versión sinfónica o para flauta o violín y piano. Los dos Tríos elegidos fueron sustanciosos y cercanos en el tiempo, poderosos ejemplos de postromanticismo: el Nº 2 de Brahms, 1882, y el Nº4, "Dumky", de Dvorák, 1891. La obra brahmsiana ya es de su arte maduro, contemporánea de las espléndidas Oberturas (Trágica y Festival Académico). Concentrada y densa en sus materiales, sus movimientos están notablemente estructurados, con múltiples hallazgos de armonía y forma en sus 36 minutos. De duración similar, el Trío "Dumky" es una adaptación al temperamento checo de la "dumka" ucraniana, balada épica que pasa de menor a mayor y de lento a rápido; Dvorák construye la partitura en seis movimientos, cada uno de ellos una dumka, y es admirable tanto la belleza melódica como la explosión de júbilo en cada fragmento rápido. Casi parece, como en las rapsodias húngaras, el paso del lassu lento al friss rápido, pero en la dumka en vez de AB es ABABA, ya que alterna varias veces. El rendimiento del Osmanthys fue siempre positivo, aunque en este caso el liderazgo del pianista fue claro: Helmchen tiene un sonido lleno y amplio y un fraseo prácticamente infalible. Las damas ciertamente tocan muy bien pero no alcanzan la fuerza y el volumen como para emparejarse con el teclado; sin embargo, la musicalidad y el rapport son evidentes y da gusto escuchar una obra de cámara ejecutada con tanto ajuste y afinidad. Y en las Dumky lograron un sentimiento de espontaneidad y entusiasmo que se transmitió al público. Curiosamente, ellos también ejecutaron como extra la Marcha Vienesa de Kreisler. AMERICAN STRING QUARTET Siguiendo la buena racha que se inició con Schiff en Bach, Nuova Harmonia presentó en el Coliseo el American String Quartet, que cumple su temporada Nº 41 pero creo que no vino antes aquí. Naturalmente que los actuales no son los mismos integrantes que al principio, pero demostraron ser instrumentistas de alto rango y aguda comprensión musical. Y como están viniendo muy pocos cuartetos internacionales, el concierto cubrió una apremiante necesidad, ya que el cuarteto de cuerdas es la forma más prístina de la música de cámara y la de mayor repertorio. Tal como vinieron estuvo integrado por Peter Winograd (primer violín), Laurie Carney (segundo violín), Daniel Avshalomov (viola) y Wolfram Koessel (violoncelo). Lástima que no haya datos biográficos específicos, pero cabe señalar que salvo Carney los apellidos no suenan muy americanos. Podría haber extranjeros que se nacionalizaron en Estados Unidos. Sea como fuere, no es un cuarteto joven sino maduro, y todos tocaron con un fuerte profesionalismo. El comienzo no fue tan bueno como el resto del programa: el Cuarteto Op.18 Nº6 de Beethoven se inició nervioso y tenso, pero fue llegando a una buena versión gradualmente hasta llegar a un movimiento final en el que "La malinconia" cedió el paso a la música alegre; en la coda retorna la melancolía pero es vencida por un jubiloso cierre. El extraordinario Octavo cuarteto de Shostakovich es de lejos el que más se toca, aunque varios otros son también de gran interés, porque resulta no sólo autobiográfico sino que su contenido es una sutil protesta contra la guerra. Varias melodías suyas son citadas, sobre todo una bien conocida de su Primera sinfonía, y además está un motivo de cuatro notas sobre las letras iniciales de su apellido que domina toda la obra; hay un salvaje Scherzo, y luego un tema lento está cortado varias veces por violentos acordes, dos movimientos Largo finalizan una obra desencantada pero de gran atractivo. Aquí el Cuarteto se lució, con gran dominio técnico más un nivel de involucramiento que creó un clima magnético. La autoridad controlada y firme de Winograd, la calidez de Carney (única dama), la personalidad indudable del violista y del violoncelista, se amalgamaron para una visión real y potente de la angustia del compositor. Tras el intervalo supieron adaptarse al mundo iridiscente de Ravel en su único Cuarteto, perfecto complemento del de Debussy. En realidad es aún más elaborado, con admirables destellos imaginativos de texturas, colores y ritmos. Los artistas estuvieron aquí en un muy alto nivel tanto individualmente o como grupo cohesionado. La pieza extra fue introspectiva, lejana de cualquier virtuosismo vacuo: la Cavatina del Cuarteto Nº14, op.130, de Beethoven. Fue un buen ejemplo de seriedad profesional de los intérpretes. CUARTETO MANUEL DE FALLA DE MADRID Con este nombre y procediendo de Madrid, parecería ser un conjunto español, pero está formado por tres argentinos que viven en ese país y uno nacido allí. Iván Cítera está entre nuestros mejores pianistas y se lo extraña, ya que nos visita rara vez. Formado por Poldi Mildner y Antonio De Raco y luego perfeccionado en Katowice, Frankfurt y Mainz, influido por clases con Sancan, Magaloff y Celibidache, Cítera llevó una doble carrera como intérprete y notable docente. Actualmente enseña en dos instituciones madrileñas: Universidad Alfonso X el Sabio y Academia International Forum Musicae. Ricardo Sciammarella, violoncelista, es hijo de Valdo, valioso compositor y director de coros; ha actuado varias veces en nuestra ciudad como solista con orquesta u ofreciendo recitales; también es director de orquesta. Ha sido docente aquí y actualmente lo es en el Centro Superior de Música del País Vasco. Por su parte, el violista Alan Kovacs, formado por Ljerko Spiller, estudió luego en Colonia y con el Cuarteto Amadeus. Activo en La Plata como cuartetista o como viola solista, desde 1991 a 1999 fue viola solista de la Sinfónica de Madrid. Es docente en las mismas instituciones que Cítera. Finalmente, Alfredo García Serrano (único nombre nuevo para mí), violinista, estudió en Madrid y luego en la Universidad de Indiana; también él es docente en los mismos lugares que Kovacs y Cítera. Es concertista solista e integra diversos grupos de cámara. Están todos unidos por la amistad y el amor a la música y fue una excelente idea incorporarlos a los Conciertos del Mediodía del Mozarteum. Cambiaron el programa a último momento, y así el Segundo Cuarteto para piano y cuerdas de Mozart fue sustituido por el Primero, y el Cuarteto Op.47 de Schumann por el Primero de Brahms. Curiosamente ambos están en sol menor, y los antes previstos en Mi bemol mayor; o sea que pasamos de obras más bien jubilosas a otras ligadas a lo dramático e intenso. Pero en ambos casos, magnífica música tan bien construida como atrayente en su material. Y en el caso de Brahms, culmina con un famoso Rondó alla Zingarese de contagioso brío y espíritu positivo (cómo olvidar, tratándose del Mozarteum, al Cuarteto Beethoven, que tantas veces nos visitó y para quienes este cuarteto era una "pièce de résistance"). Y en cuanto a Mozart, recordar que mientras lo escribía en Viena en plena madurez, un adolescente Beethoven creaba sus tres cuartetos para piano y cuerdas en Bonn; fueron los primeros en imaginar esta textura de piano y cuerdas. Cítera fue en todo momento la figura descollante, magisterial, por la perfección de su técnica y su infalible sentido del fraseo; un sonido noble y amplio puesto al servicio del compositor. Los tres ejecutantes de cuerda son sin duda profesionales de categoría, pero sin la garra de los elegidos. Sin embargo, el todo fue mayor que la suma de las partes y el balance final resultó muy grato. QUINTETO ARTE También en los Conciertos del Mediodía, se pudo apreciar al Quinteto Arte en dos partituras esenciales de este género que combina al piano con el cuarteto de cuerdas: el Segundo Quinteto de Dvorák y el de Schumann. Lograron conservar la concentración y la calma mientras en la platea escuchábamos con regularidad las bombas que tiraban manifestantes en Corrientes, claro signo de la agresividad corrosiva de una pequeña minoría no controlada (para no ser acusados de represión…). El concierto fue bastante bueno sin llegar a convencer plenamente. Aquí también la figura dominante fue la muy experimentada pianista María Cristina Filoso, en notable nivel técnico y comprensión de los estilos. El violoncelista Siro Bellisomi fue el que mostró mayor calidad tímbrica; es integrante fundador del Trío Williams. El tejano Scott Moore resulta un correcto violista de sonido algo seco pero bien afinado. El primer violín, Oleg Pishenin (concertino de la Orquesta Estable del Colón), es a veces demasiado incisivo aunque da énfasis a los momentos culminantes. Y el entrerriano David Coudenhove, miembro de la Estable y antes de la Sinfónica Nacional, un buen elemento a veces demasiado remiso, se integra bien en el conjunto. El tan melódico como brioso Quinteto de Dvorák vuelve a demostrar que es el único postromántico que puede medirse con Brahms, de quien era admirador y amigo. Y el de Schumann es sin duda su mejor obra de cámara en cuanto a material y realización. Nada nuevo en esta mezcla, pero cuánta belleza.Pablo Bardin

Johann Sebastian Bach
(1685 – 1750)

Johann Sebastian Bach (21 March 1685, - 28 July 1750) was a German composer, organist, harpsichordist, violist, and violinist whose sacred and secular works for choir, orchestra, and solo instruments drew together the strands of the Baroque period and brought it to its ultimate maturity. Although J.S. Bach did not introduce new forms, he enriched the prevailing German style with a robust contrapuntal technique, an unrivalled control of harmonic and motivic organisation, and the adaptation of rhythms, forms and textures from abroad, particularly from Italy and France. Bach's abilities as an organist were highly respected throughout Europe during his lifetime, although he was not widely recognised as a great composer until a revival of interest and performances of his music in the first half of the 19th century. He is now generally regarded as one of the main composers of the Baroque style, and as one of the greatest composers of all time. Revered for their intellectual depth, technical command and artistic beauty, Bach's works include the Brandenburg Concertos, the Goldberg Variations, the Partitas, The Well-Tempered Clavier, the Mass in B minor, the St Matthew Passion, the St John Passion, the Magnificat, A Musical Offering, The Art of Fugue, the English and French Suites, the Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin, the Cello Suites, more than 200 surviving cantatas, and a similar number of organ works, including the famous Toccata and Fugue in D minor and Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor, as well as the Great Eighteen Chorale Preludes and Organ Mass.



[+] More news (Johann Sebastian Bach)
Oct 25
Google News UK
Oct 25
Guardian
Oct 25
NY Times
Oct 24
Tribuna musical
Oct 24
Tribuna musical
Oct 24
Meeting in Music
Oct 24
Meeting in Music
Oct 23
My Classical Notes
Oct 22
Guardian
Oct 22
Topix - Classical...
Oct 22
My Classical Notes
Oct 22
Wordpress Sphere
Oct 22
Wordpress Sphere
Oct 21
Topix - Classical...
Oct 21
The Well-Tempered...
Oct 21
NY Times
Oct 20
My Classical Notes
Oct 20
ArtsJournal: music
Oct 20
Topix - Classical...
Oct 20
Music and Vision ...

Johann Sebastian Bach




Bach on the web...



Johann Sebastian Bach »

Great composers of classical music

Cantatas Brandenburg Concertos Well-Tempered Clavier Goldberg Variations Mass

Since January 2009, Classissima has simplified access to classical music and enlarged its audience.
With innovative sections, Classissima assists newbies and classical music lovers in their web experience.


Great conductors, Great performers, Great opera singers
 
Great composers of classical music
Bach
Beethoven
Brahms
Debussy
Dvorak
Handel
Mendelsohn
Mozart
Ravel
Schubert
Tchaikovsky
Verdi
Vivaldi
Wagner
[...]


Explore 10 centuries in classical music...